Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Bwanalewis

Next Subgun

Location:

13 posts in this topic

I currently have an Uzi, S&W 76 (waiting on Stamp.)  I am thinking of getting a Sten.  Seems pretty straight forward, lots of parts.   I know very little about the different models.  Any thoughts?

Bwanalewis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Sterling over a Sten

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on your budget.  You are looking at double the price for a sterling over a sten.  Both are great Subgun but their respective prices make them not particularly comparable.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes.  I am looking for a sten, or information on a sten.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The STEn is a surprisingly good gun.  It's as basic as they come.  A good gun for new shooters as it is easy to shoot well, reliable with good mags, and uncomplicated. 

It can be customized easily with lots of stock, barrel, suppressor, and other options.  As mentioned, parts are easy to find and relatively inexpensive.  You will find that the gun will need very little in the way of replacement parts.  It's weakness is the magazine.  Fortunately, magazines are still relatively inexpensive and easy to find.  Believe it or not, I have seen a lot of magazines discarded as unreliable that were simply dirty or full of cosmoline.  Feed lip angle issues are easy to spot and fix.  Magazines with the brass wires limiting capacity are easy to change back to full capacity and usually less expensive than the others.

Semi-auto trip levers are prone to bending as they are simple sheet metal.  Most folks don't bother using semi-auto as it is very easy to get single shots with a little trigger control.  Most STEns have a hole on the left side of the receiver that allows the bolt handle to be pushed in and lock the bolt forward.  This is a safety feature to keep the bolt from bouncing backwards (and firing) if the gun is dropped with a loaded magazine inserted.

Do NOT hold it by the magazine well like they do in the movies.  This can induce stoppages from magazine movement as well as inaccuracy from lateral dispersion.  The barrel shroud is there for a reason.

There are several options for magazine loaders.  My favorite is the simple 'spoon' style that clips on the back of the mag.  Easy to use and gives good leverage to push down each round.  Regardless of the type you choose, be sure to get one.  Magazines are very difficult to fully load without one.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, 1gewehr said:

The STEn is a surprisingly good gun.  It's as basic as they come.  A good gun for new shooters as it is easy to shoot well, reliable with good mags, and uncomplicated. 

It can be customized easily with lots of stock, barrel, suppressor, and other options.  As mentioned, parts are easy to find and relatively inexpensive.  You will find that the gun will need very little in the way of replacement parts.  It's weakness is the magazine.  Fortunately, magazines are still relatively inexpensive and easy to find.  Believe it or not, I have seen a lot of magazines discarded as unreliable that were simply dirty or full of cosmoline.  Feed lip angle issues are easy to spot and fix.  Magazines with the brass wires limiting capacity are easy to change back to full capacity and usually less expensive than the others.

Semi-auto trip levers are prone to bending as they are simple sheet metal.  Most folks don't bother using semi-auto as it is very easy to get single shots with a little trigger control.  Most STEns have a hole on the left side of the receiver that allows the bolt handle to be pushed in and lock the bolt forward.  This is a safety feature to keep the bolt from bouncing backwards (and firing) if the gun is dropped with a loaded magazine inserted.

Do NOT hold it by the magazine well like they do in the movies.  This can induce stoppages from magazine movement as well as inaccuracy from lateral dispersion.  The barrel shroud is there for a reason.

There are several options for magazine loaders.  My favorite is the simple 'spoon' style that clips on the back of the mag.  Easy to use and gives good leverage to push down each round.  Regardless of the type you choose, be sure to get one.  Magazines are very difficult to fully load without one.

Thanks for the information.  I know I have seen some names that put these together like ERB and DLO.  I guess they used new "tubes" with WWII parts kits.  Or should I look for a WWII gun, or does it really matter...

Chad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A C&R Sten is going to cost you around the same as a Sterling tube gun would. Unless you need to have an original gun just go with a tube Sten from a well known builder to shoot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, Bwanalewis said:

Thanks for the information.  I know I have seen some names that put these together like ERB and DLO.  I guess they used new "tubes" with WWII parts kits.  Or should I look for a WWII gun, or does it really matter...

Chad

Depends on what you want to do with it.  If the historical value of a C&R gun has meaning for you, than pay the extra money and get the C&R STEN.  If  an investment is what you’re interested in, than pay the extra money and get the C&R because, as stated already, they generally sell for a bit more (though all FAs steadily increase in value over time) And collectors are after those.  If you just want to go to the range and shoot, then it may not be important to have a C&R gun. Whatever meets your needs and makes you happy, man.

Edited by Armydoc0115

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, Armydoc0115 said:

Depends on what you want to do with it.  If the historical value of a C&R gun has meaning for you, than pay the extra money and get the C&R STEN.  If  an investment is what you’re interested in, than pay the extra money and get the C&R because, as stated already, they generally sell for a bit more (though all FAs steadily increase in value over time) And collectors are after those.  If you just want to go to the range and shoot, then it may not be important to have a C&R gun. Whatever meets your needs and makes you happy, man.

Very good points.  I think I am going to go down the modern tube with WWII parts.  Thanks for all the insight.  Now just need to find a good candidate.

Thanks again.

Chad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A JAC manufactured STEN Mk. II was my very first machinegun. 

I've had a lot of fun with it over the years. Plain, simple, reliable...

I paid just over $4k for her in 2012, but to me she is priceless.

-KristopherH

 

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MontanaRenegade86 said:

A JAC manufactured STEN Mk. II was my very first machinegun. 

I've had a lot of fun with it over the years. Plain, simple, reliable...

I paid just over $4k for her in 2012, but to me she is priceless.

-KristopherH

 

1 hour ago, MontanaRenegade86 said:

This will not be my first MG, but from everyone I talk to, I also look forward to a SM II.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a DLO Mk. II Sten and love it! You're going to love yours too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, BrettBaker said:

I have a DLO Mk. II Sten and love it! You're going to love yours too!

It's a fun gun, for sure.

If one gets bored with 9mm, a 7.62 Tokarev barrel and Colefire magazine can spice things up a bit. If you go that route, watch your recoil spring. :D 

-KristopherH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0