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tranham

WTS: 1918A2 BAR C&R SOLD

Location: Nashville, TN

6 posts in this topic

1918a2 BAR made by New England Small Arms Corp

C&R gun refinished.

Comes with 5 magazines and sling.

SOLD

Pictures

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/1db0hvuvqiz3qo3/AADQc_IitD2ux4tblozZpm9Ea?dl=0

I am listing some NFA weapons for a friend that is parting out part of his collection. Contact me for questions Robert 615-418-2073 tranham@hotmail.com

From Wikipedia

“Final development of the M1918A2 was authorized on 30 June 1938. The FN-designed pistol grip and rate-reducer mechanism with two rates of automatic fire was shelved in favor of a rate-reducer mechanism designed by Springfield Armory, and housed in the buttstock. The Springfield Armory rate reducer also provided two selectable rates of fully automatic fire only, activated by engaging the selector toggle. Additionally, a skid-footed bipod was fitted to the muzzle end of the barrel, magazine guides were added to the front of the trigger guard, the handguard was shortened, a heat shield was added to help the cooling process, a small separate stock rest (monopod) was included for attachment to the butt, and the weapon's role was changed to that of a squad light machine gun. The BAR's rear sight scales were also modified to accommodate the newly standardized M2 Ball ammunition with its lighter, flat-base bullet. The M1918A2 walnut buttstock is approximately one inch longer than the M1918 BAR buttstock. The M1918A2 barrel was also fitted with a new flash suppressor, and fully adjustable iron sights. Late in the war, a barrel-mounted carrying handle was added.

 

Because of budget limitations, initial M1918A2 production consisted of conversions of older M1918 BARs (remaining in surplus) along with a limited number of M1922s and M1918A1s. After the outbreak of war, attempts to ramp up new M1918A2 production were stymied by the discovery that the World War I tooling used to produce the M1918 was either worn out or incompatible with modern production machinery. New production was first undertaken at the New England Small Arms Corp. and International Business Machines Corp. (a total of 168,000 new weapons were manufactured). In 1942, a shortage of black walnut for buttstocks and grips led to the development of a black plastic buttstock for the BAR.Composed of a mixture of Bakelite and Resinox, and impregnated with shredded fabric, the buttstocks were sandblasted to reduce glare. Firestone Rubber and Latex Products Company produced the plastic buttstock for the U.S. Army, which was formally adopted on March 21, 1942.The M1922 machine rifle was declared obsolete in 1940, but they were used by Merrill's Marauders in Burma later in the war as a slightly lighter alternative to the M1918A2.

 

Production rates greatly increased in 1943 after IBM introduced a method of casting BAR receivers from a new type of malleable pig iron developed by the Saginaw division of General Motors, called ArmaSteel. After successfully passing a series of tests at Springfield Armory, the Chief of Ordnance instructed other BAR receiver manufacturers to change over from steel to ArmaSteel castings for this part.During the Korean War, M1918A2 production was resumed, this time contracted to the Royal McBee Typewriter Co., which produced an additional 61,000 M1918A2s.”

 

Edited by tranham

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I believe its a reweld. Sorry should have put in title. Paperwork posted in pics.

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A FOIA would be really nice to have with this gun 

Edited by eMGunslinger

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Any video of the gun firing? Since it is a reweld it would be good to understand what was repaired and if there are any issues?

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