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  2. Transferable MG - NEW/Unused condition Several in stock On Form 3 in Georgia - Fast E-Form Transfer to your FFL $12,900 In 2003, the original inventor, John Stemple collaborated with BRP Corp to make new and replacement parts for the Stemple 76/45 receivers he manufactured prior to the 1986 cutoff. From this came a series of compatible drop-on parts for the unmodified/transferable Stemple 76/45 receivers known as Stemple Takedown Gun (STG) setups. Since nothing is welded or hand fitted to these receivers, changing setups and replacing parts is fast and easy. These are the most finely built and smooth running sub-machine guns on the transferable market. We build them for performance and durability, stock plenty of high-quality spare parts, and provide excellent service. There is only a limited number of these pre-1986 registered/transferable machine guns remaining, so get one while they last. The Stemple STG M1A1/1928 is assembled from an original Stemple 76/45 machine gun receiver, newly made Stemple-compatible parts, and several original Thompson components. The Stemple 76/45 machine gun receiver inserts into a long receiver shroud. This holds the receiver in position with lower assembly and aligns the sear opening in the Stemple receiver with the new sear in the original Thompson fire control group. The bolt guide, bolt, barrel, mainspring, buffer, and guide rod assembly is a removable unit inserted through the front of the Stemple receiver. These main wear parts are easily repaired or replaced if necessary. The overall appearance of the STG M1A1/1928 is like that of an original M1A1, with the exception that the rectangular adapter housing for the Stemple 76/45 receiver tube is 3/16 in. taller and 3/4 in. longer than the original M1A1. Parts and Accessories Included With Each Gun: 1 x 50 rd drum, 1 x 20rd mag, multi tool, wrench, vertical or horizontal foregrip, both picatinny rear sight & standard "L" sight, both barrels 10" M1A1 pattern barrel & 8" threaded barrel .578x28, and custom hard case with high density foam. Free Factory Training. 45 ACP Suppressor: add $425 STG M1A1/1928 Data Caliber: .45 acp Barrel Length: 10.5 in. M1 Pattern Barrel and 8 in. Threaded Barrel (.578-28) Magazine: Unmodified USGI M1A1/1928 Mags and Drums Rear Sight: Original M1A1 or "L" for 1928, and Picatinny Rail included Forend: vertical (reproduction) or horizontal (original) Cycle Rate: 750 rpm (Full-Auto/Safe only... no semi-auto function) Weight: 11 lbs (unloaded) Simple / DurableDesign: Our guns are very difficult to break and very easy to fix. They are simple blow-back guns and very smooth-running in long full-auto bursts. Easy-to-Replace Parts: There's nothing on these guns that cant be easily replaced. We designed this system to protect the registered receiver from any wear during use. The only parts that can wear can be easily replaced without the need to ship the gun back-and-forth. Available Service: If you need service, we are here to support our products. Shoot Cheap Ammo: We typically just shoot steel-cased ammo. Our milled steel trunions easily deal with potential wear issues from any type of ammo. Can't Get Too Hot: These are ideal for machine-gun shoots. The low-pressure 45ACP round cannot create enough heat in the barrel to damage the gun. There's no gas system to clog, and the open-bolt system negates any cook-off risk. Great Investment: Just ask someone who bought a transferable machine gun 10-20 years ago how they feel about their purchase. Most of them will say they wish they bought more. Also ask someone who sold a machine gun 10-20 year ago how they feel about the sale. Most of them will say they wish they never sold it. Since the ban on new registrations in 1986, the finite supply of transferable machine guns availble for individuals in the US has steadily appreciated in value. We put a lot of thought into preserving the Long-Term Value of these guns. They are designed for maximum durability and serviceability. The worst thing that can happen to a transferable machine gun is a damaged or broken receiver. The parts that can wear out in these STG configurations are not the registered parts. Further, the moving and impacted parts in the system are overbuilt for their function and easy to replace if necessary: minimal effort, zero fitting, and no need to send the gun to a specialist for repair. We stock plenty of spare parts and provide free service. These guns will outlast anything on the transferable market. To our customers: I’m a firm believer in ‘try before you buy’. If you’d like to see and shoot some of our guns I’d encourage you to make a trip to our facility in GA. It would be our pleasure to host. We cover assembly, disassembly, maintenance, troubleshooting, and alternate configurations. This one-on-one course takes approximately 4 hours. We can also go to the nearby range to shoot as well. Please don’t hesitate to call or write if we can be of further assistance. Also, please go to our web site for more information, pictures, and videos of our products. www.brpguns.com info@brpguns.com Office/Fax: 678-425-9585 http://www.brpguns.com/stemple-76-45-takedown-gun-stg-m1a1-1928-setup/
  3. Today
  4. BTT... one sold... still have 3 left. Can deliver to KCR in October. Aaron - Mohnton, Pa Sales@BeltFeds.Com
  5. XM177 commando info needed

    Thanks for the history! I knew that the model was a rarity since whenever you mention it people immediately think you are talking about the Colt SMG 9mm, Model 639 (Thanks Colt for adding confusion to the situation!) I guess the experience was such that Colt would rather forget about ever producing the original MOD.639. The most interesting part of the story is that ATF apparently first started "flexing their muscles" in the early '70's with this Moderator/Slencer controversy. Back then $200 was considered a bit more money than it is now, and being TOLD by a federal agency that what you paid for and had transferred to you by ATF, was "ex post facto" now being determined to actually be a gun requiring two tax stamps since the "moderator" had been reclassified as a "silencer"! My gun (#56) was owned by an Alabama attorney who never paid the additional $200, and, as the story goes, had ATF pay for having the Moderator/ "silencer" professionally engraved. The original owner's son showed me the back and forth correspondence with ATF, but what I read seemed to indicate that ATF stood their ground. Leaves me wondering though, how many people gave up their moderators in exchange for a Colt bird cage flash hider, either because of cost or perceived Govt. intimidation, making a true configuration MOD.639 that more rare!
  6. Yesterday
  7. The Defender Holster - IWB/OWB - HK VP9 - RH - $79.95 L.A.G Tactical The Defender Holster - IWB/OWB - HK P30 - RH - $79.95 L.A.G Tactical The Defender Holster - IWB/OWB - HK VP9 - LH - $79.95 L.A.G Tactical In stock and ready to ship today. HKPARTS https://www.hkparts.net/ (801) 987-3494
  8. I'm open to original or repro for the 08.
  9. Remarcable Arms Wallingford CT 203 284 9506 email is best joelcramer@aol.com I will transfer regular guns and NFA items
  10. XM177 commando info needed

    The 639s where manufactured circa '72 for import. All were made to XM177E2 specifications including the moderators. They were released for domestic sale during one of the many Colt bankruptcies in the '70s/'80s when the need for cash became pressing. I have heard two stories about them. One story said they were made for the Shah of Iran and the other story said they were destined for some South or Central American country. In either case, Uncle Sugar refused to allow Colt to export them. They went back into Colt's inventory and forgotten about. Here are my notes that I have scraped together over the years: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ FWIW, I have done some extensive research on 639s and I (personally) am convinced that there are at most about 100 guns that were ever roll-marked “MOD. 639” by Colt’s and that this is one of the last in the S/N range. You are free to read my rationale below and judge for yourself. Regarding genuine 639s, here is what I know: • I've identified 10 different guns that have sold or been advertised for sale or been publicized or for which owners have sent me details that are roll-marked "MOD. 639". ALL 10 are in the range 4,790,015 to 4,790,100. • I’ve received confirmation regarding 3 additional guns that are "within that range", but for which the owners would not disclose the actual S/Ns. • I’ve received confirmation of S/Ns for two skids of 639s (41 guns total) that were delivered to Aeromarine (Birmingham) in the early 70s, for commercial sale. ALL 41 are in the range 4,790,015 to 4,790,100. Only a few of these are known to be transferable (i.e. can be legally owned by a civilian). • I’ve also identified a number of guns that have been advertised over the years as “639s” that were not roll-marked as such. Apparently, the sellers referred to their guns as “639s” because they had short barrels and XM177 moderators – without the gun being factory roll-marked “MOD. 639”. So, buyer beware of guns merely advertised as “Colt 639”. Maybe they came from the factory as true XM177s or maybe they simply had a short-barrel upper and XM177 moderator added later – it’s anyone’s guess. In summary, 51 guns are “accounted for” (to my knowledge) as genuine 639s and all are in the S/N range 4,790,015 to 4,790,100 (a range of 86 guns). Statistically, that means that it is very unlikely that more than about 100 true 639s were ever made. My personal belief is that Colt's made S/Ns 4,790,001 through 4,790,100 in 1972 (100 guns total). When 1975 came around and they still had dealers with unsold 639s and they also had to recall all the XM177 moderators, they decided not to make any more "MOD. 639" guns and just used spare parts from then on to make generic short-barreled M16s (for the commercial, non-military market), with no special roll-mark or special designation, and with a bird-cage flash hider instead of an XM177 moderator. That's purely conjecture on my part, though. Here are a few pcis of mine with a Rick Keuhl .22lr upper show above it: BTW; Rick Keuhl made a dynamite .22lr conversion. It runs like a champ.
  11. I am looking for small parts for the 20mm Lahti ATC, especially the "clock spring" for the hand crank. Also, the canvas cover. Let me know what you gots. Thanks! Mike inpa
  12. Need value on unique M2 carbines

    Back awhile ago there was 30 carbine ammo marked LC52, plain brown boxes with the LC52 in blue ink, that stuff was definitely corrosive Chinese ammo.
  13. XM177 commando info needed

    Cool stuff! Thanks for sharing! Any idea on how many went into U.S. circulation, or how many kept their "silencer" (moderator)? Not that I would be surprised by inconsistency with ATF Rulings, but isn't the XM 177 "moderator" just like the one on the MOD.639? Does it too require registration? I wonder what value is attached to these guns currently? Thanks again for your input!
  14. WTS: Auto Ordnance Thompson 1928 $20,000

    BTT
  15. WTS: M10A1, .45ACP $7000

    BTT
  16. In the market for NORINCO TYPE 86S AK BULLPUP. Have cash ready !
  17. WTB: Valmet .223 Mags Wanted

    Recently acquired a valmet m76, looking to buy original valmet 223 magazines. Please let me know if somebody has them. Thanks
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